Neda Ratanawongsa, MD, MPH

Associate Professor

Neda Ratanawongsa, MD, MPH, is an Associate Professor of Medicine in the Division of General Internal Medicine and UCSF Center for Vulnerable Populations and the Chief Medical Informatics Officer for the San Francisco Department of Public Health. Researching the electronic health record (EHR) revolution in safety net care, she is strategizing how innovations in EHR design, implementation, and policy can support compassionate, effective health care for diverse patients. Dr. Ratanawongsa is a mixed methods researcher, with expertise in implementation research, qualitative research, and conversational analysis. She has developed, implemented, and evaluated curricula at the undergraduate, graduate and continuing medical education levels. She has led national committees with the Society of General Internal Medicine (SGIM) and Academy on Communication in Healthcare (ACH).

Dr. Ratanawongsa received her undergraduate and medical degrees at Harvard, then came to UCSF for residency and chief residency in internal medicine. She completed a Masters in Public Health and General Internal Medicine Fellowship at Johns Hopkins University and joined the faculty at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center as an Assistant Professor and Assistant Residency Program Director. She joined the UCSF Division of General Internal Medicine and UCSF Center for Vulnerable Populations in 2008.
Education
M.P.H., 06/2007 - , Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Residency, 06/2003 - Internal Medicine, University of California, San Francisco
M.D., 06/2000 - , Harvard Medical School
B.A., 06/1996 - Social Studies, Harvard University
Honors and Awards
  • Milton W. Hamolsky Junior Faculty Award, Society of General Internal Medicine, 2008
Websites
Publications
  1. Certified Medical Interpreters’ Perspectives on Relationship-Centered Communication in Safety-Net Care [Version 2].
  2. Certified Medical Interpreters’ Perspectives on Relationship-Centered Communication in Safety-Net Care.
  3. Reducing Misses and Near Misses Related to Multitasking on the Electronic Health Record: Observational Study and Qualitative Analysis (Preprint).
  4. The Johns Hopkins Aliki Initiative: A Patient-centered Curriculum for Internal Medicine Residents.
  5. Adherence to Colorectal Cancer Screening Among Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Low-Income Patients – Does Patient-Provider Language Concordance Matter?.